Wednesday, September 17, 2014
spaceexp:

Diagram of the Saturn V Rocket cut in half -

spaceexp:

Diagram of the Saturn V Rocket cut in half -

from-the-earth-to-the-moon13:

Happy 84th Birthday to Apollo 10 & ASTP Commander Tom Stafford!

humanoidhistory:

Happy birthday to Konstantin Tsiolkovsky, the father of spaceflight, born on September 17, 1857 in Izhevskoye, Russia. To celebrate, let’s do some fun facts:

  • He was the son of a Polish deportee to Siberia.
  • At age ten he nearly became deaf from scarlet fever.
  • Like many pioneers of space travel, he was inspired by the science fiction of Jules Verne. (See Hermann Oberth for another Verne fan.)
  • Tsiolkovsky wrote his own sci-fi stories.
  • He built the first Russian wind tunnel in 1897.
  • In 1903 he published a rocket equation in a Russian aviation magazine. Called the Tsiolkovsky formula or Tsiolkovsky rocket equation, it described the relationships among rocket speed, the speed of the gas at exit, and the mass of the rocket and its propellant.
  • In 1929 he published his theory of multistage rockets, based on his knowledge of propulsion dynamics.
  • He was a big proponent of humanity moving out into the vastness of outer space: “Earth is the cradle of humanity, but one cannot remain in the cradle forever.”
  • Inspired in 1895 by the newly constructed Eiffel Tower in Paris, Tsiolkovsky was the first person to conceive of a space elevator.
  • During his lifetime he published approximately 90 works on space travel and related subjects, including designs for rockets with steering thrusters, multistage boosters, space stations, airlocks for exiting a spaceship, and closed-cycle biological systems to provide food and oxygen for space colonies.
  • There’s a crater named in his honor on the far side of the Moon.
  • He is often called the “father of spaceflight.” He’s also been called “the father of theoretical and applied cosmonautics.” (One has more dramatic punch than the other.)
  • Interestingly, Tsiolkovsky never built a rocket.

(NASA/Wikipedia/RussianSpaceWeb)

engineeringhistory:

Sony TC-50 pocket cassette recorder for dictation, carried on NASA’s Apollo 10 mission, October 1968.

engineeringhistory:

Sony TC-50 pocket cassette recorder for dictation, carried on NASA’s Apollo 10 mission, October 1968.

from-the-earth-to-the-moon13:

Happy 84th Birthday to Apollo 14 LMP Ed Mitchell!

When someone does a risky Jenga move and you’re like

When someone does a risky Jenga move and you’re like

11/16/66, Cape Kennedy: “Astronaut Ed Aldrin leans around to check his name on big sign detailing the exploits of the Gemini astronauts. Aldrin and James Lovell (R) returned 11/16 to spot from which their four-day-long Gemini-12 flight - the last in the series - began 11/11.”

11/16/66, Cape Kennedy: “Astronaut Ed Aldrin leans around to check his name on big sign detailing the exploits of the Gemini astronauts. Aldrin and James Lovell (R) returned 11/16 to spot from which their four-day-long Gemini-12 flight - the last in the series - began 11/11.”

A 1962 drawing that predicted space kitchens of the future.

A 1962 drawing that predicted space kitchens of the future.

from-the-earth-to-the-moon13:

Alan and Louise Shepard in Boston during a parade held on June 15, 1962.

from-the-earth-to-the-moon13:

Alan and Louise Shepard in Boston during a parade held on June 15, 1962.

red-lipstick:

NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center -  View of the Earth on September 21, 2005 with the full Antarctic region visible.

red-lipstick:

NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center -  View of the Earth on September 21, 2005 with the full Antarctic region visible.

(Source: svs.gsfc.nasa.gov)