Sunday, October 9, 2011

kaiyves:

From the final “Legacy” section of the museum. 

itsfullofstars:

Food for Apollo - On the Menu in 1969. Yum?

Source: Retro Space Images Facebook page.

YEAH PEANUT CUBES

Also, I would rather have a corned beef sandwich than the chicken sandwich.

Tuesday, October 4, 2011
fyeahcosmonauts:

Sputnik 1 was launched today in 1957. It only sent signals for 22 days, the batteries gave out on the 26th of October. It remained in orbit until 4 January 1958.
“Nobody back then was thinking about the magnitude of what was going on: everyone did his own job, living through its disappointments and joys.” -Oleg Ivanovsky, deputy designer for Sputnik

fyeahcosmonauts:

Sputnik 1 was launched today in 1957. It only sent signals for 22 days, the batteries gave out on the 26th of October. It remained in orbit until 4 January 1958.

“Nobody back then was thinking about the magnitude of what was going on: everyone did his own job, living through its disappointments and joys.” -Oleg Ivanovsky, deputy designer for Sputnik

Monday, September 26, 2011

itsfullofstars:

Equipment that would have been attached to Skylab for the boost……..that never happened.

Source.

Tuesday, September 20, 2011
ralphewig:

Searching for Snoopy - a team led by UK amateur astronomer Nick Howes (known for his passion for hunting asteroids) is now going after a piece of human space history.   During the Apollo 10 mission, the lunar module, nicknamed “Snoopy” was jettisoned and sent into an orbit around the Sun — 42 years later, it is still believed to be out there … somewhere.

 ”We’re expecting a search arc up to 135 million kilometers in size which is a huge amount of space to look at,” British amateur astronomer Nick Howes told Discovery News. “We’re aware of the scale and magnitude of this challenge but to have the twin Faulkes scopes assist the hunt, along with schools, plus the fact that we’ll doubtless turn up many new finds such as comets and asteroids makes this a great science project too.”


This is really cool; but they’d better be careful, because there might be some very strange things aboard Snoopy.

ralphewig:

Searching for Snoopy - a team led by UK amateur astronomer Nick Howes (known for his passion for hunting asteroids) is now going after a piece of human space history.   During the Apollo 10 mission, the lunar module, nicknamed “Snoopy” was jettisoned and sent into an orbit around the Sun — 42 years later, it is still believed to be out there … somewhere.

 ”We’re expecting a search arc up to 135 million kilometers in size which is a huge amount of space to look at,” British amateur astronomer Nick Howes told Discovery News. “We’re aware of the scale and magnitude of this challenge but to have the twin Faulkes scopes assist the hunt, along with schools, plus the fact that we’ll doubtless turn up many new finds such as comets and asteroids makes this a great science project too.”

This is really cool; but they’d better be careful, because there might be some very strange things aboard Snoopy.

Thursday, August 25, 2011
kaiyves:

itsfullofstars:

Today 402 years ago (August 25, 1609) Galileo Galilei introduce his telescope to the Venetian Lawmakers. While Galileo did not invent the telescope, his was the first to be used for astronomy. In fact, less than 5 months after he introduced the telescope, he discovered three moons traveling around Jupiter and just a few days later he discovered the fourth one. His observations of the satellites of Jupiter created a revolution in astronomy that reverberates to this day: a planet with smaller planets orbiting it did not conform to the principles of Aristotelian Cosmology, which held that all heavenly bodies should circle the Earth, and many astronomers and philosophers initially refused to believe that Galileo could have discovered such a thing. Fast forward to February 11, 2010; NASA Solar Dynamics was launched into Space - the most sophisticated solar observatory ever built. We have come long ways and today we should remember and thank Galileo for looking to the stars!
Source: NASA SDO.

Here’s to Galileo. 

kaiyves:

itsfullofstars:

Today 402 years ago (August 25, 1609) Galileo Galilei introduce his telescope to the Venetian Lawmakers. While Galileo did not invent the telescope, his was the first to be used for astronomy. In fact, less than 5 months after he introduced the telescope, he discovered three moons traveling around Jupiter and just a few days later he discovered the fourth one. 

His observations of the satellites of Jupiter created a revolution in astronomy that reverberates to this day: a planet with smaller planets orbiting it did not conform to the principles of Aristotelian Cosmology, which held that all heavenly bodies should circle the Earth, and many astronomers and philosophers initially refused to believe that Galileo could have discovered such a thing. 

Fast forward to February 11, 2010; NASA Solar Dynamics was launched into Space - the most sophisticated solar observatory ever built. We have come long ways and today we should remember and thank Galileo for looking to the stars!

Source: NASA SDO.

Here’s to Galileo. 

Friday, August 12, 2011
kaiyves:

todaysdocument:

We Can Tag It! 
We need your help tagging photos and documents in the online catalog for the National Archives.  
With every tag you add, you’re doing your part to help the next person discover that record.  Go ahead and give it at try.  
Visit the catalog.  Do a search for your favorite topics or events.  Create a login and start tagging!

On it! I’ve already tagged some NASA items!

Now that is cool. I wish LIFE would do something like this.

kaiyves:

todaysdocument:

We Can Tag It! 

We need your help tagging photos and documents in the online catalog for the National Archives.  

With every tag you add, you’re doing your part to help the next person discover that record.  Go ahead and give it at try.  

Visit the catalog.  Do a search for your favorite topics or events.  Create a login and start tagging!

On it! I’ve already tagged some NASA items!

Now that is cool. I wish LIFE would do something like this.

Wednesday, August 10, 2011
complex34:

itsfullofstars:

Proposal for pigs in space, circa 1963.
Source: Retro Space Images Facebook page.

I will never not reblog this. It’s just so weird. Really weird.

One of my favorite NASA proposals!
One of their commenters on Facebook had the best observation: "Why did the artist feel like he had to accurately depict the pig’s testicles? It’s okay to leave something to the imagination."

complex34:

itsfullofstars:

Proposal for pigs in space, circa 1963.

Source: Retro Space Images Facebook page.

I will never not reblog this. It’s just so weird. Really weird.

One of my favorite NASA proposals!

One of their commenters on Facebook had the best observation: "Why did the artist feel like he had to accurately depict the pig’s testicles? It’s okay to leave something to the imagination."